» Texas High Court Holds Limitation-Of-Liability Clause Can Effectively Bar a Party From Obtaining Punitive Damages

Texas High Court Holds Limitation-Of-Liability Clause Can Effectively Bar a Party From Obtaining Punitive Damages

In November 2018, the state supreme court issued a written opinion in a Texas breach of contract case discussing whether a clause purporting to limit the availability of punitive damages in a contract between two business was enforceable. Ultimately, the court concluded that the term was enforceable and reversed the lower court’s award of punitive damages.

According to the court’s opinion, the plaintiffs planned to purchase an aircraft from the defendant manufacturer, Bombardier. The nature of the transaction was somewhat complex in that it involved several purchasing companies and subsidiaries; however, in essence, the transaction was for the sale of an aircraft.

During negotiations, Bombardier required the plaintiffs to execute a management agreement so that Bombardier could handle preliminary matters such as inspection and registration of the aircraft. The contract contained a clause stating that neither party could be held liable to the other party for any “indirect, special or consequential damages and/or punitive damages for any reason, including delay or failure to furnish the aircraft or by the performance or non-performance of any management services covered by this Management Agreement.”

While Bombardier marketed the plane as new, the aircraft’s engines were previously installed on other planes. When the plaintiffs found this out, they filed several claims against Bombardier, including a claim for punitive damages. The case proceeded to trial, and the jury awarded $2,694,160 in actual damages for fraud and $5,388,320 in exemplary (punitive) damages.

Bombardier appealed, making several arguments including that the award for punitive damages was improper based on the valid agreement signed by the plaintiffs. Initially, the court agreed with the plaintiffs that, absent the agreement, punitive damages would have been appropriate. However, the court explained that it has “long recognized the strongly embedded public policy favoring freedom of contract,” and that the parties in this case indisputably entered into a contract agreeing to waive any right to pursue punitive damages.

The plaintiffs argued that Bombardier knew that the engines were not new and violated a fiduciary duty when it failed to inform them that the engines were used. However, the court held that the plaintiffs’ general claim that Bombardier fraudulently concealed this information did not specifically mention the violation of a fiduciary duty. Thus, the court did not consider whether the violation of a fiduciary duty eliminated any protection the contract provided to Bombardier. Instead, the court held that any fraud on Bombardier’s part did not void the agreement because the court must “respect and enforce terms of a contract that parties have freely and voluntarily entered.”

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